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Recombinant Antibodies for Research and Diagnostic Assay Manufacturing



WEBINAR

Recombinant Antibodies – Reverse engineering and critical immunoassay-derived raw materials for scalable and reproducible research, and diagnostic assay manufacturing.

As a combined result of increases in research and medical diagnostic immunoassay volumes, pressure on the global supply system of animal hosts and other traditional means of antibody production has grown tremendously. Specifically, the shortage of animal-derived materials because of the COVID-19 pandemic has spiked their demand, highlighting the need for sustainable and robust means of producing critical reagents.

In this presentation, the speakers will summarize the reverse engineering of critical IVD-IHC antibodies, and novel active and passive blocking products derived through novel B-cell cloning methods. These methods aim at sustainability and consistency, thereby reducing the impact on animal hosts. Our capabilities at Merck to support further recombinant antibody developments and collaborations will also be detailed.

In this webinar, you will learn:

  • Reverse engineering of critical IVD-IHC antibodies
  • Active and passive blocking products derived through B-cell cloning
  • Our capabilities of large-scale recombinant Ab production
  • Scope for collaborative manufacturing of antibodies

Speakers

Sean Roenspie

Sean Roenspie

Merck

Senior Research Scientist - Antibody Discovery Group

Senior Research Scientist in the Antibody Discovery group at Merck in Rocklin, California. Sean earned his Master’s degree focused in Molecular Biology from CSU, Sacramento. He is an expert in molecular biology techniques including molecular biology assay development, vector design, recombinant PCR methods for gene synthesis and mutagenesis, lentiviral/retroviral transduction, and recombinant protein expression. Protein analysis includes ELISA development, HPLC, IHC techniques and staining, and Western Blot. Developed transient transfection platform used by ISCO (Integrated Supply Chain Operations) for antibody production. Created a stable cell line platform using CHO (CHINESE HAMSTER OVARY) cells and developed a proprietary vector technology to produce recombinant antibodies for use in multiple applications. Sean is currently involved in multiple animal welfare projects as well as overseeing the stable cell line process.

Juliet Rashidian, Ph.D.

Juliet Rashidian, Ph.D.

Merck

Senior Research Scientist - Antibody Discovery Group

Juliet earned her M. Sc. in Microbiology from the University of Tehran, Iran, and her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of Ottawa, Canada. Juliet was a Post-Doctoral Fellow in the cancer research field at the University of California, Berkeley. Juliet became an expert in developing mouse hybridomas before joining Merck in 2014. Juliet and her team at Merck established a Single Cell Cloning platform to generate novel rabbit and goat monoclonal antibodies. Juliet has generated several recombinant rabbit monoclonal antibodies, including antibodies that detect mutation and phosphorylation in biopsy sections. These antibodies are used for IVD IHC applications. She also performs tissue DNA sequencing, which is a part of the process of generating mutant antibodies. She has recently joined the stable cell line platform team to develop stable cell lines expressing recombinant antibodies. This platform uses CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells to produce recombinant antibodies.

Michael Moehlenbrock, Ph.D.

Michael Moehlenbrock, Ph.D.

Merck

Business Development Manager - Diagnostic Immunoassays

Michael Moehlenbrock Ph.D. is currently a Business Development Manager and specialist in diagnostic immunoassays for Merck. Before this role, Michael held several roles in product management including head of product management for Merck Research Antibodies portfolio. Michael has his Ph.D., and Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from St. Louis University where his interdisciplinary research areas of focus included microfluidic analytical chemistry, enzymatic biosensors and biofuels cells, enzymology, and metabolic substrate channeling, and materials chemistry

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